Media Coverage

This is the place to read what people are saying about The Day, and the importance of news-based learning, in the media. We’ve given interviews in magazines, written features in newspapers and appeared on the television and radio, discussing the importance of current affairs to young people.

School House magazine

School House magazine

The Day’s chairman and editor-in-chief, Richard Addis, wrote the leader for the Spring/Summer 2018 edition of School House magazine. He discussed the special parliamentary commission on Fake News and the Teaching of Critical Literacy Skills in Schools. This is a cross-party look at how to improve media literacy for young people, which is being conducted in partnership with The Day and others. “If our children learn to think for themselves I am sure we can win the war against fake news,” he wrote.

TES

TES

The head of the National Literacy Trust, Jonathan Douglas, writes for TES about the launch of the special parliamentary commission on Fake News and the Teaching of Critical Literacy Skills in Schools, which is happening in partnership with The Day and others. Expert witnesses, including The Day’s chairman and editor-in-chief, Richard Addis, gave evidence to the commission in February 2018.

The New York Times

International Herald Tribune

The author and journalist DD Guttenplan went to see how Holland Park secondary school in central London, and nearby Burlington Danes Academy, have been using The Day’s daily service. He wrote about why we believe teenagers need a tailored current affairs service for The New York Times. As our editor Richard Addis says: “If nobody understands the real stories, and nobody can be bothered to explain them, we’ll all be less well informed.”

The Sunday Times

The Sunday Times

Rosie Kinchen, deputy editor of The Sunday Times News Review, visited the City of London academy in 2012. She met the teacher Paul Pearce, who said that even his most reluctant readers would pay attention to The Day. “Once you have it on a screen, it’s a completely different matter. The students use technology in every aspect of their lives now and it makes the written word seem more exciting and current.”